The flag at Glass Lake

Three months ago, I tested out a new Russian super-telephoto lens, the MC MTO-1100, on my Nikon Df.  And although the results were okay, I couldn’t remove the lens from the camera without taking the entire lens assembly apart.

Nertz.

On Sunday, after Allen at CameraWorks repaired the Russian lens, I tested it out one more time.

I wanted to capture some fall foliage this year, and I heard that some amazing fall foliage existed at Glass Lake, a little hamlet near Averill Park.  I drove there, hoping to find some beautiful shoreline where I could set up my gear and take lots of photos.

Nope.  Apparently 97.5% of Glass Lake is surrounded by private beachfront property.  No trespassing.

No big deal.  I hear there’s a spot on Glass Lake Road where one can access the lake from a public fishing spot –

Nope.  The fishing boat launch is under repair.  More “No Trespassing” signs.

Nertz.

Okay.  Guess I’ll skip over photographing this lake and go find another … hey … what’s that in the water?

It looks like a tiny, rocky island.  And there’s – is that a flagpole on that island?

Nertz.  Nothing in my camera arsenal is going to help me photograph that …

Except …

Okay, camera lens.  You get one more chance.  Either you work for me … or you’re going back to Vladivostok or wherever you were built.

I attached the lens to my Nikon Df and hoped for the best.

Breathe.  Deep…

Take the photo…

The Flag at Glass Lake. Nikon Df camera, MC MTO-1100 telephoto lens. Photo by Chuck Miller.
The Flag at Glass Lake. Nikon Df camera, MC MTO-1100 telephoto lens. Photo by Chuck Miller.

Pow.

Now this Russian lens is a telephoto prime lens – I can’t zoom in or out – but I can turn the photo from portrait, as you see here, to landscape.

And let’s see what a landscape photo looks like with this supertele.

The Flag at Glass Lake 2. Nikon Df camera, MC MTO-1100 telephoto lens. Photo by Chuck Miller.
The Flag at Glass Lake 2. Nikon Df camera, MC MTO-1100 telephoto lens. Photo by Chuck Miller.

All right.  Now for the big test.

I pressed the lens release button on the Nikon Df and slowly twisted the camera lens.

Pop.  Simple disconnect.

Whew.

Okay, you monster Russian lens … you get an additional reprieve.  Especially with photos like that.

Now show me that you can get me a “Competition Season” photo…

I mean it.  I’m counting on you.

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