Finally!! Niagara 1970 1995 2016!!

There’s too much of a dreamer in me.  Too much of trying to pull my concepts and ideas out of my tangled, damaged brain and put them into some sort of cognizant thought.

Thus begat my concept of splitfilm.  In splitfilm, a photographer takes two (or more) rolls of film and rolls them together so that the films can be exposed simultaneously.  The resultant image looks as if it is fighting to cross various frames and borders.

In the past, I’ve had four splitfilm pictures land on the walls of various competitions.  All of them claimed ribbons of one sort or another; and my most successful splitfilm picture – The AGFA Bridge Over Ansco Lake – claimed Best in Show at Durham in 2013.

And last week, when I went to Niagara Falls with a crateload of camera gear and a lifetime of leave-it-at-the-shore emotions … I wanted to find some way to create a surreal splitfilm photo of my visit.  I had previously wrapped some Kodak Instamatic 126 film in a roll of 70mm Kodak Verichrome Pan film, and photographed a few shots of it in the AGFA Chief camera.

When the film was developed, I saw the results and thought that the B&W Verichrome didn’t turn out as well.  So I posted the Instamatic film shot… and left it at that.

Well, actually, I was looking at the wrong frame of Verichrome Pan film.  I did eventually find the one frame that correctly matched up – and I combined it with the shot of Instamatic film…

And…

Niagara 1970 1995 2016. AGFA Chief camera, Kodak Verichrome Pan 70mm film (expiry 1970), Kodak Instamatic Gold 200 film (expiry 1995). Photo by Chuck Miller.
Niagara 1970 1995 2016. AGFA Chief camera, Kodak Verichrome Pan 70mm film (expiry 1970), Kodak Instamatic Gold 200 film (expiry 1995). Photo by Chuck Miller.

I call this picture “Niagara 1970 1995 2016,” with the first two four-digit numbers representing the expiration dates of the Verichrome Pan film (1970) and the Instamatic Gold 200 film (1995), with 2016 being the year the photo was taken, developed, and scanned.

Ka-bang.

As you can see, the foamy swirls in the water match and connect from B&W to color film.  You can see a tiny hint of the rainbow at the bottom fo the B&W frame, as it blends into the color frame.

I have to admit.  I’ve had a lot of fun with this splitfilm concept.

This may be my most fun image yet.

Short pile for sure.

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