Stepping past the mind’s eye

My name is Chuck Miller, and I have too many cameras.

(and the crowd says, “Hi Chuck…”)

Actually, here’s the problem I’m battling.  Of late, I’ve had cameras that were specifically designated to shoot one type of film.  And when I need to take a trip, I don’t want to take nine cameras with me.  I want some of my cameras to shoot different types of film.

And since my Leica M3 (“Leica Green”) camera has done well for itself, I wanted to see if it could handle infrared photography.

Right now, I have an infrared 35mm shooter, my Minolta x370s.  But honestly, I need to trim down the camera herd.  So if Leica Green can handle some infrared film, then that’s certainly a plus.

I purchased a 39mm Hoya R72 infrared filter, screwed it onto the Leica’s Summicron 5cm lens, and packed my last roll of Kodak HIE infrared film into the camera chassis.

And I went for a walk.

Let’s see what infrared photography looks like in St. Agnes Cemetery, shall we?  Green grass that turns white, blue skies that turn black, yeah this should be fun.

Okay,

Touhey memorial. Leica M3 camera, Summicron 50mm lens, Kodak HIE film with Hoya R72 filter. Photo by Chuck Miller.
Touhey memorial. Leica M3 camera, Summicron 50mm lens, Kodak HIE film with Hoya R72 filter. Photo by Chuck Miller.

Okay, it’s official.  The Minolta’s going to find a new home.

I checked a few more shots on the roll.  Here they are.

Majestic. Leica M3 camera, Summicron 50mm lens, Kodak HIE film with Hoya R72 filter. Photo by Chuck Miller.
Majestic. Leica M3 camera, Summicron 50mm lens, Kodak HIE film with Hoya R72 filter. Photo by Chuck Miller.
CLO0135-R1-E033
Father and Mother. Leica M3 camera, Summicron 50mm lens, Kodak HIE film with Hoya R72 filter. Photo by Chuck Miller.
CLO0135-R1-E011
Carr and Waters. Leica M3 camera, Summicron 50mm lens, Kodak HIE film with Hoya R72 filter. Photo by Chuck Miller.

Got it.  This little Leica just moved up in the rotation.

A few things to remember.  I need to bracket all my shots between f/16 and f/11.  I also have to bracket-focus – when focusing for infrared, you need to compose your shot and then adjust your focus so that you’ve lined up to a specific “R” on the lens.  Essentially, you’re focusing PAST your viewable point, since you’re photographing the infrared spectrum.  Yeah, I know it sounds like I just explained the infield fly rule, but I get a sense that you understand what I’m saying.

Oh yeah.  One more thing.  With my last couple of shots on the HIE roll, I took a couple of pictures of one grave marker.

You know… a shot for good luck.

allen

Yeah.  Looks great in infrared, doesn’t it?  Almost looks like the marker was positioned in a bale of straw.

Again… always pay respects whenever you can.

That’s important.

Very important.

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