A cold shot of Snovlox

I’ve had success with Revolog’s boutique “Tesla” film, which came pre-printed with electrical strikes.  All I do is shoot the film, and hope that the lightning strikes appear in the right places.  And thus came the award-winning Jesus Saves photo.

With that in mind, I decided to try another Tesla limited-edition boutique film, a compound called Snovlox.  Snovlox is a black-and-white alternate to Revolog’s “Volvox” brand, which produces little green globs on the finished film.  By contrast, Snovlox produces little white blobs, similar to tiny snowballs, on the film.  As a B&W film, it produces images that could be the equivalent of those shot with Kodak’s T-MAX film.

200 rolls of Snovlox were produced by Revolog this year; I bought two of them.  One will be reserved for my ultrawide “Raskolnikov” Krasnogorsk FT-2 camera; while the other will be funneled through my Nikon F100.

Starting out with the 35mm film camera, I was able to take some shots around the Capital District.  Nothing major, a few shots here and there, just to test out the roll.

Next up – a Monday drop-off at McGreevy Pro Lab.  Say it with me, everyone, it’s not a Monday morning unless I’m dropping film off at McGreevy Pro Lab.

I explained to the staff at the lab that Snovlox film would contain white blobs and splotches, which would be a normal by-product of the film’s development.

Wednesday afternoon, I picked up the developed film, along with a CD of digital scans of the Snovlox film.  “When the film was developed,” Joe from the lab told me, “the technician was worried, because she thought something was wrong with the film.”

“No,” I laughed, “it’s like I said, this film has white splotches on it, and it should be developed as Kodak T-Max 100 film.”

“Should be or is?” Joe laughed, pointing to the negatives.

Now I know WHY the product needs to be developed like Kodak T-Max 100 film.  The film WAS Kodak T-Max film that was modified with splotches and blobs.

Anyways…  Have a good look at some Snovlox photos.  And rest assured, it was not snowing on any day that these photos were taken.

53 Third Street, Troy, N.Y.
53 Third Street. Nikon F100 camera, Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 lens, Revolog Snovlox film (reformulated Kodak T-Max 100 film). Photo by Chuck Miller.
Horsemen at Limerick Parade, Albany, N.Y.
The Horsemen at North Albany’s St. Patrick’s “Limerick” Parade. Nikon F100 camera, Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 lens, Revolog Snovlox film (reformulated Kodak T-Max 100 film). Photo by Chuck Miller.
Standing tree at Thacher Park overlook
The solitary tree at Helderberg Escarpment, Thacher Park. Nikon F100 camera, Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 lens, Revolog Snovlox film (reformulated Kodak T-Max 100 film). Photo by Chuck Miller.

 

Normanskill Creek, Albany, N.Y.
Icicles on the Normanskill Creek Bridge, Albany. Nikon F100 camera, Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 lens, Revolog Snovlox film (reformulated Kodak T-Max 100 film). Photo by Chuck Miller.

So based on what I’ve achieved so far, it seems that the best way to use this Snovlox film is to photograph it against buildings, or against flowing water or growing forests.

This is nice. I have one roll of this limited-edition Revolog Snovlox left…

And I’m going to have fun with it soon.

Trust me on this.

 

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